Crawford Isn't Fishing for Compliments, but He's Getting Them Anyway

by Kieran Mulvaney

Some boxers are more accustomed than others to the routine of answering an interviewer's questions. Naturally outgoing and expansive, they're more than ready to share the details of their life. Ricky Hatton was a journalist's dream: an open book, he rarely seemed to take life seriously and would often leave his audience in stitches as he cracked jokes and regaled them with tales of his life outside of boxing.

At the other end of the scale are the quieter types, more circumspect in their responses, answering what is asked and little more. Terence Crawford fits into that box, not out of a lack of friendliness, but more as a product of Midwestern reticence when speaking about oneself. Until, that is, the moment his features break into a wide grin, when he is asked if there is anything about him that boxing fans would find surprising.

"Oh man," he smiles. "I love to fish. That's one thing that I've been doing since I was probably five years old. River fishing, lake fishing, pond fishing, everywhere fishing," he expounds. "I just love to fish." He demurs with a laugh when it is suggested he may want to compare notes with Gennady Golovkin, the middleweight champion who had earlier confided his own love of the same activity. Perhaps they could arrange a fishing trip to Kazakhstan. "I don't know that I want to go all the way out there," he chuckles.

Crawford comes across as the kind of young man who just likes to get on with his job, and to do what he does best, which is boxing with impressive skill for a relatively inexperienced professional. His dismantling of Breidis Prescott on the undercard of Mike Alvarado's March win over Brandon Rios earned rave reviews; and as he prepares to make his third HBO appearance of 2013 – against undefeated Andrey Klimov – on Saturday, it is clear he has the full and enthusiastic backing of his promoter, Bob Arum.

Unsurprisingly, he does not get carried away by the praise he has received for his wins against Prescott and, in June, Alejandro Sanabria.

"I felt like, you know, I was overdue," he says. "I felt like I should have [already] been in the spotlight, but I waited my time and my time is here and I'm going to make the most of it." He concedes that, "it feels great to have those kinds of people believe in me, like I believe in myself," but he doesn't feel compelled to say too much about it.

Instead, he'll save the bulk of his talking for where it counts: in the ring.

Read the Complete Quick Hits: Terence Crawford at HBO.com.